Germany, Frankfurt

Goethe University

Bachelor, MBA

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Goethe University Frankfurt, positioned among the top international research universities, offers a wide variety of academic programs, a diverse group of research institutes, and a focus on interdisciplinary approaches to solving complex problems.

The university is named after Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, the Frankfurt-born polymath renowned for his exceptional contributions to literature, science, and philosophy. Founded in 1914 with private funding and inspired by the legacy of the European Enlightenment, Goethe University stands out as a pioneering “citizens’ university”— and the history of the university is one of openness and public participation.

The Country

Germany is a federal parliamentary republic in western-central Europe. The country consists of 16 states and its capital and largest city is Berlin. Germany covers an area of 357,021 square kilometers and has a largely temperate seasonal climate. With 80.6 million inhabitants, it is the most populous member state in the European Union. Germany is the major economic and political power of the European continent and a historic leader in many cultural, theoretical and technical fields. Germany has the world’s fourth-largest economy by nominal GDP and the fifth-largest by purchasing power parity. As a global leader in several industrial and technological sectors, it is the second-largest exporter and third-largest importer of goods. It is a developed country with a very high standard of living, featuring comprehensive social security that includes the world’s oldest universal health care system.

The City

Frankfurt am Main, commonly known as Frankfurt, is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth- largest city in Germany. The actual urban area has a population of 2,500,000. The city is at the centre of the larger Frankfurt Rhine-Main Metropolitan Region, which has a population of 5,600,000 and is Germany’s second-largest metropolitan region. Since the enlargement of the European Union in 2013, the geographic centre of the EU is about 40 km east of Frankfurt. Frankfurt is the largest financial centre in continental Europe and ranks among the world’s leading financial centres. The European Central Bank is the central bank of the eurozone, consisting of 18 EU member states that have adopted the euro (€) as their common currency and sole legal tender. In 2010, 63 national and 152 international banks had their registered offices in Frankfurt, including the headquarters of the major German banks, notably Deutsche Bank, Commerzbank, DZ Bank and KfW, as well as 41 representative offices of international banks.

Estimated Expenses

Rough Expense Comparison

Semester at ZSEM

Semester at Frankfurt School of Finance Management

Health Insurance

Airfare

201 EUR

Housing/Utilities*

287 EUR

414 EUR

Internet/cable*

28 EUR

22 EUR

Food*

177 EUR

225 EUR

Books

Included

Transportation*

16 EUR

81 EUR

Visa

*per month

Accommodation

Studentenwerk currently manages more than half of all dormitories in Frankfurt. Seventeen dorms offer more than 1,850 rooms for students at Goethe University and two other universities in Frankfurt.

Travel Opportunities

Monuments to see in Frankfurt:

  • Römerberg is the old centre of Frankfurt, with a number of historic buildings dating to the 14th and 15th century (many of which, unfortunately, were destroyed during World War II and rebuilt afterwards). The Römer itself is the town hall of Frankfurt. Next to the cathedral, at the Archäologische Garten, you can see the remains of the Roman settlements that gave this place its name.
  • Dom is the main cathedral, built in Gothic style in the 14th century on the foundation of an earlier church. From 1562 to 1792, emperors of the Holy Roman Empire were crowned in the cathedral. It is possible to ascend the spiral stairs of the 95 metre church tower.
  • Alte Oper is a Renaissance Opera Building in the center of the city, on a busy square with fountains and cafés. Originally opened in 1880, it is not used for operas any more since the rebuilding after the war, but for concerts, congresses, and similar “fancy” events.